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Design

White Moleskine

For the first time, a white Moleskine notebook, white as fresh milk, white cover, white elastic band, blank ruled pages.

Bearing the YOOX logo embossed on the front cover, it’s available in limited edition for Xmas exclusively at yoox.com.

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Hermès

Japanese designer Tokujin Yoshioka has created an installation in Tokyo for fashion brand Hermès, where a movie of a woman appears to blow on a scarf hanging in the window.

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Snasen

Great art direction by Snasen for fashion brand FIN.

Via Binky the doormat.

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Form Follows Fun

Loving the Form Follows Fun t-shirt from those purveyors of fine headphones, AIAIAI.

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Jamie Mitchell: Jaqueline Rabun

Lots of lovely design work for print and online in the portfolio of Jamie Michell including a brand identity and business plan concept for jeweller Jacqueline Rabun.

Jamie Mitchell: Jaqueline Rabun

Jamie Mitchell: Jaqueline Rabun

Jamie Mitchell: Jaqueline Rabun

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Ogle lamp

The LED powered Ogle light, designed by Form Us With Love for Swedish lighting manufacturer Ateljé Lyktan, combines the functionality of a spotlight with the elegance of a pendant lamp and looks particularly effective when clustered together.

Ogle lamp

Ogle lamp

Via We Heart.

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Alessi AL13000 watch

Alessi AL13000 watch

Loving the clean lines of the Alessi AL13000 watch, with the unique etched black number indexes on the outer edge of it’s matt stainless steel case and modern open face design.

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Mr Noir and Miss Grigio

Loving these wine labels for the Marauding Vintners brand, designed by /M/A/S/H/ with illustrations by Harry Slaghekke.

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László Moholy-Nagy: Light Space Modulator

László Moholy-Nagy, pioneering Hungarian designer/photographer/film maker/painter of the Bauhaus movement, designed the Light Space Modulator, to create pools of light and shadow so he could study their movement.

“This piece of lighting equipment is a device used for demonstrating both plays of light and manifestations of movement. The model consists of a cube-like body or box, 120 x 120 cm in size, with a circular opening (stage opening) at its front side. On the back of the panel, mounted around the opening are a number of yellow, green, blue, red, and white-toned electric bulbs (approximately 70 illuminating bulbs of 15 watts each, and 5 headlamps of 100 watts). Located inside the body, parallel to its front side, is a second panel; this panel too, bears a circular opening about which are mounted electric lightbulbs of different colors. In accordance with a predetermined plan, individual bulbs glow at different points. They illuminate a continually moving mechanism built of partly translucent, partly transparent, and partly fretted materials, in order to cause the best possible play of shadow formations on the back wall of the closed box. (When the demonstration occurs in a darkened space, the back wall of the box can be removed and the color and shadow projection shown on a screen of any chosen size behind the box.) The mechanism is supported by a circular platform on which a three-part mechanism is built. The dividing walls are made of transparent cellophane, and a metal wall made of vertical rods. Each of the three sectors of the framework accommodate a different, playful movement study, which individually goes into effect when it appears on the main disc revolving before the stage opening.”

Light Space Modulator (1922-1930), by László Moholy-Nagy, currently showing at Bauhaus 1919–1933: Workshops for Modernity, at MoMa, New York.

Via Daily Icon.

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Salt and Pepper Bots

Passing the salt by hand just isn’t efficient enough in a world of bullet trains, pizza delivery and broadband.

However, the condiments have come to life!  These wind-up Salt and Pepper Bots pose more of a threat to dull tastes than the human race.

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