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Splashdown

The Apollo 17 spacecraft, containing astronauts Eugene A. Cernan, Ronald E. Evans, and Harrison H. Schmitt, glides to a safe splashdown at 2:25 p.m. EST on Dec. 19, 1972, 648 kilometers (350 nautical miles) southeast of American Samoa.

Via NYC Aviation.

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Atlas 17D

Atlas 17D rocket at Cape Canaveral, September 17, 1959.

Via VOSTOKPROJECT.

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Fireball XL5

Fireball XL5, Ep-01 Planet 46, 1962.

I’m a tootie – why didn’t I think of that before?

Via simple dreams.

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Prospero

The British satellite Prospero being launched into orbit on the 28th October, 1971 in Woomera, Australia.

Via The Casual Optimist.

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Sculpture on the Moon: The Fallen Astronaut

Sculpture on the Moon: The Fallen Astronaut

At 12:18 a.m. Greenwich Mean Time on Aug. 2, 1971, Commander David Scott of Apollo 15 placed a 3 1/2-inch-tall aluminum sculpture onto the dusty surface of a small crater near his parked lunar rover. At that moment the moon transformed from an airless ball of rock into the largest exhibition space in the known universe. Scott regarded the moment as tribute to the heroic astronauts and cosmonauts who had given their lives in the space race. …

Read more on Slate.

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Selfie of the week

Via @BuzzFeedAndrew.

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Robert

Robert the anthropomorphic transparent robot from Fireball XL5, 1962-63.

Via Rhett Hammersmith.

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Plan 9 from Outer Space

Via Rhett Hammersmith.

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Warp factor 8

Warp factor 8

Welcome to the working week.

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Scott Carpenter R.I.P.

Scott Carpenter R.I.P.

M. Scott Carpenter, whose flight into space in 1962 as the second American to orbit the Earth was marred by technical problems and ended with the nation waiting anxiously to see if he had survived a landing far from the target site, died on 10th October in Denver. He was 88 and one of the last two surviving astronauts of America’s original space program, Project Mercury.

Via The New York Times.

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