— iainclaridge.net

Apple 2c

Apple IIc, final design, 1983. According to Hartmut Esslinger, frog design was forced to edit and re-edit the design in response to petty criticisms from the Apple II team, whose “trivial technical arguments [masked] their NIH (Not Invented Here) syndrome — a dispiriting process I called ‘form follows ego.’”

Courtesy Hartmut Esslinger, from the book Keep it Simple: The Early Design Years of Apple.

Via Metropolis.

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André Kertész: Eye and Lips

Untitled, (Eye and Lips), 1970, by André Kertész.

Via KitschMyAss.

 

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Gemma Hadley

Gemma Hadley

Two collages by Central St Martins graduate and live TV presenter (!) Gemma Hadley.

Shown above are We Are All Stars (top) and Mistress.

Having already exhibited alongside Banksy and Damien Hirst, Hadley’s themes naturally gravitate to power, obsession and sexuality through a mix of textiles, paint, wax, wood, and found imagery. She is also currently working on a statement jewellery collection.

More examples of Hadley’s work can be found here on Saatchi’s website or at Apostle Art.

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Ryan X-13 Vertijet

Ryan X-13 Vertijet

Ryan X-13 Vertijet.

Via Kemon01 and Wikipedia.

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Twirl

Personal photograph – uncredited – from someone’s private album (from 1954).

Via The English Group.

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Gisele Bundchen x Stéphane Sednaoui

Gisele Bundchen photographed for Vogue India by Stéphane Sednaoui.

Via The English Group.

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Alexander Calder x Myron Wood

Mobile by Alexander Calder at Georgia O’Keeffe’s house in Abiqui, New Mexico, 1980.

Photograph by Myron Wood (1921-1999).

Via little augury.

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Brooklyn To Mars

Just recently to have arrived through my letterbox was a little package containing four issues of Brooklyn To Mars, a limited edition, hand-numbered zine published by Markus Almond.

Each issue is typed on a yellow portable Remington typewriter and pages laid out by hand with scissors and a glue stick. Containing mainly inspirational passages on life and the creative processes affecting artists, entrepreneurs and lone wolves, each piece of writing (which Almond calls ‘paraprose’) is given it’s own page and occasionally decorated with a 19th century pictoral image.

Here is the philosophy behind this beautifully produced little zine:

“John Glenn was the first American to orbit the earth. He did this on February 20, 1962. Glenn was able to leave our world on a poorly constructed rocketship. He floated in space and gazed at the earth. This was before computers were realistically usable, before the internet existed, and even before the Beatles released their first album.

If a man is able to leave the earth using primitive technology, think of all the possibilities in your life today.

This is what Brooklyn To Mars seeks to explore. It’s about learning from incredible people and saying, “I can do that.” Brooklyn To Mars is about starting from where you are today and going someplace extraordinary.”

Having just struggled through the first Christmas since the break up of my marriage, reading through Almond’s collected inspirational musings was just the thing I needed right now to help lift my spirits and break on through to a new chapter in my life.

Brooklyn To Mars is available from the Markus Almond Shop.

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Vivien Leigh

Vivien Leigh, c.1937.

Via KitschMyAss.

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ǝnɹʇ

Via guzzigazz.

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